mani en moku

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François SCHWICKER

mani en moku

Postby François SCHWICKER » Wed Aug 27, 2008 5:44 am


ma ali la tomo mani li pakala. tenpo pini mute la jan lawa Sijatelo
(Seattle) li toki e ni : "jan li ken ala moku e mani". ona li toki e
lon.

jan Kanso


frpeterjackson

Re: mani en moku

Postby frpeterjackson » Thu Aug 28, 2008 9:35 pm


--- In tokipona@yahoogroups.com, François SCHWICKER <bubi4919@...> wrote:
>
> ma ali la tomo mani li pakala. tenpo pini mute la jan lawa Sijatelo
> (Seattle) li toki e ni : "jan li ken ala moku e mani". ona li toki e
> lon.
>
> jan Kanso
>
jan lawa Sijatelo li toki ala e ni!

o lukin e ni:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chief_Seattle

There is a controversy about a speech by Sealth concerning the
concession of native lands to the settlers.

Even the date and location of the speech has been disputed,[4] but the
most common version is that on March 11, 1854, Sealth gave a speech at
a large outdoor gathering in Seattle. The meeting had been called by
Governor Isaac Ingalls Stevens to discuss the surrender or sale of
native land to white settlers. Doc Maynard introduced Stevens, who
then briefly explained his mission, which was already well understood
by all present.[1]

Sealth then rose to speak. He rested his hand upon the head of the
much smaller Stevens, and declaimed with great dignity for an extended
period. No one alive today knows what he said; he spoke in the
Lushootseed language, and someone translated his words into Chinook
Indian trade language, and a third person translated that into English.

Some years later, Dr. Henry A. Smith wrote down an English version of
the speech, based on Smith's notes. It was a flowery text in which
Sealth purportedly thanked the white people for their generosity,
demanded that any treaty guarantee access to Native burial grounds,
and made a contrast between the God of the white people and that of
his own. Smith noted that he had recorded "...but a fragment of his
[Sealth's] speech". Recent scholarship questions the authenticity of
Smith's supposed translation.[5]

In 1891, Frederick James Grant's History of Seattle, Washington
reprinted Smith's version. In 1929, Clarence B. Bagley's History of
King County, Washington reprinted Grant's version with some additions.
In 1931, John M. Rich reprinted the Bagley version in Chief Seattle's
Unanswered Challenge. In the 1960s, articles by William Arrowsmith and
the growth of environmentalism revived interest in Sealth's speech.
Ted Perry introduced anachronistic material, such as shooting buffalo
from trains, into a new version for a movie called "Home"[6], produced
for the Southern Baptist Convention's Christian Radio and Television
Commission.[7] The movie sunk without a trace, but this newest and
most fictional version is the most widely known. Albert Furtwangler
analyzes the evolution of Sealth's speech in Answering Chief Seattle
(1997).[8]

The speech attributed to Sealth, as re-written by others, has been
widely cited as "powerful, bittersweet plea for respect of Native
American rights and environmental values"[6], but there is little
evidence that he actually spoke it. A similar controversy surrounds a
purported 1855 letter from Sealth to President Franklin Pierce, which
has never been located and, based on internal evidence, is considered
"an unhistorical artifact of someone's fertile literary imagination".[4]


Francois Schwicker

Re: Re: mani en moku

Postby Francois Schwicker » Fri Aug 29, 2008 3:46 am

sina toki e lon : jan lawa Sijatelo li toki ala e nimi ni lon toki ona tawa jan lawa pi ma Mewika. 

 

taso mi lukin e jan lawa Sijatelo lon lape. ona li toki e nimi ni tawa mi.

 

jan li ken toki e ni lon toki Inli :

"an unhistorical artifact of someone's fertile literary imagination" .

ni li lon kin.

 

jan Kanso

 



--- On Fri, 8/29/08, frpeterjackson <frpeterjackson@yahoo.com> wrote:

From: frpeterjackson <frpeterjackson@yahoo.com>
Subject: [tokipona] Re: mani en moku
To: tokipona@yahoogroups.com
Date: Friday, August 29, 2008, 3:35 AM




--- In tokipona@yahoogroup s.com, François SCHWICKER <bubi4919@.. .> wrote:
>
> ma ali la tomo mani li pakala. tenpo pini mute la jan lawa Sijatelo
> (Seattle) li toki e ni : "jan li ken ala moku e mani". ona li toki e
> lon.
>
> jan Kanso
>
jan lawa Sijatelo li toki ala e ni!

o lukin e ni:

http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Chief_Seattle

There is a controversy about a speech by Sealth concerning the
concession of native lands to the settlers.

Even the date and location of the speech has been disputed,[4] but the
most common version is that on March 11, 1854, Sealth gave a speech at
a large outdoor gathering in Seattle. The meeting had been called by
Governor Isaac Ingalls Stevens to discuss the
surrender or sale of
native land to white settlers. Doc Maynard introduced Stevens, who
then briefly explained his mission, which was already well understood
by all present.[1]

Sealth then rose to speak. He rested his hand upon the head of the
much smaller Stevens, and declaimed with great dignity for an extended
period. No one alive today knows what he said; he spoke in the
Lushootseed language, and someone translated his words into Chinook
Indian trade language, and a third person translated that into English.

Some years later, Dr. Henry A. Smith wrote down an English version of
the speech, based on Smith's notes. It was a flowery text in which
Sealth purportedly thanked the white people for their generosity,
demanded that any treaty guarantee access to Native burial grounds,
and made a contrast between the God of the white people and that of
his own. Smith noted that he had recorded "...but a fragment
of his
[Sealth's] speech". Recent scholarship questions the authenticity of
Smith's supposed translation. [5]

In 1891, Frederick James Grant's History of Seattle, Washington
reprinted Smith's version. In 1929, Clarence B. Bagley's History of
King County, Washington reprinted Grant's version with some additions.
In 1931, John M. Rich reprinted the Bagley version in Chief Seattle's
Unanswered Challenge. In the 1960s, articles by William Arrowsmith and
the growth of environmentalism revived interest in Sealth's speech.
Ted Perry introduced anachronistic material, such as shooting buffalo
from trains, into a new version for a movie called "Home"[6], produced
for the Southern Baptist Convention's Christian Radio and Television
Commission.[ 7] The movie sunk without a trace, but this newest and
most fictional version is the most widely known. Albert Furtwangler
analyzes the evolution of Sealth's speech in
Answering Chief Seattle
(1997).[8]

The speech attributed to Sealth, as re-written by others, has been
widely cited as "powerful, bittersweet plea for respect of Native
American rights and environmental values"[6], but there is little
evidence that he actually spoke it. A similar controversy surrounds a
purported 1855 letter from Sealth to President Franklin Pierce, which
has never been located and, based on internal evidence, is considered
"an unhistorical artifact of someone's fertile literary imagination" .[4]





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